Spangenhelm 3rd/4th C

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Spangenhelm 3rd/4th C
SKU: RTU790
UPC: 680596072539
Actual Weight: -----
Shipping Weight: -----
MSRP: -----



Product Detail



Product Name: Spangenhelm 3rd/4th C
SKU: RTU790
UPC: 680596072539

Features

  • curved conical shape culminating in a rounded point
  • high carbon steel plates connected via riveted strips topped by a riveted disc plate
  • high carbon steel hinged cheek flaps with riveted detailing and leather strap for wear ability attached to the riveted head band
  • partial chain-mail aventail

Description

The Spangenhelm was a popular medieval European combat helmet design of the Early Middle Ages. The name is of German origin. Spangen refers to the metal strips that form the framework for the helmet and could be translated as braces, and -helm simply means helmet. The strips connect three to six steel or bronze plates. The frame takes a conical design that curves with the shape of the head and culminates in a point. The front of the helmet may include a nose protector (a nasal). Older spangenhelms often include cheek flaps made from metal or leather. Spangenhelms may incorporate mail as neck protection, thus forming a partial aventail.

This Spanenhelm features: a curved conical shape culminating in a rounded point. A high carbon steel plates connected via riveted strips topped by a riveted disc plate. High carbon steel hinged cheek flaps with riveted detailing and leather strap for wear ability attached to the riveted head band, with and attached, partial chain-mail aventail

Inspiration

A surviving Spangenhelm, 6th century (Kunsthistorisches Museum, Vienna): 640px-Helm_DSC02149.JPG

Spangenhelm (iron), Migration Period - Museum of the Cetinska Krajina Region - Sinj, Croatia: 800px-Spangenhelm-Sinj.JPG

Historical

3rd and 4th century The spangenhelm arrived in Western Europe by way of what is now southern Russia and Ukraine, spread by nomadic Iranian tribes such as the Scythians and Sarmatians who lived among the Eurasian steppes. By the 6th century it was the most common helmet design in Europe and in popular use throughout the Middle East. It remained in use at least as late as the 9th century