Roman Frying Pan (Tinned)

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D.-AH3982N-Roman-Frying-Pan-(Tinned)-(Patera).jpg
Roman Frying Pan (Tinned)
SKU: AH3982N
Actual Weight: -----
Shipping Weight: -----
MSRP: -----



Product Detail



Product Name:Roman Frying Pan (Tinned)

SKU: AH3982N

Features

  • tin lined brass pan/Patera
  • 17 around x 3 3/4 tall
  • 1 lb 10 oz
  • Please note that these utensils should not be used for cooking/ eating. They are for reenactment purpose only.

Description

This is a newly redesigned Roman cooking and eating bowl, based on numerous archaeological examples. It is manufactured of fairly heavy brass and the interior is tinned so as to keep food away from the unpleasant taste of brass. This version has been redesigned with the assistance of scholars, reenactors, and other experts from the online discussion board, Roman Army Talk. Heavy brass handle properly attached with tin lining for safety, this is the Patera to have! A great item for your personal kit. Please note that these utensils should not be used for cooking/ eating. They are for reenactment purpose only.

Historical Period

In the material culture of classical antiquity, a phiale or patera[1] (Latin pronunciation: [ˈpatera]) is a shallow ceramic or metal libation bowl. It often has a bulbous indentation (omphalos, "bellybutton") in the center underside to facilitate holding it, in which case it is sometimes called a mesomphalic phiale. It typically has no handles, and no feet. (A drinking cup with handles is a kylix. A circular platter with a pair of C-handles is not a patera, but a few paterae have a single long straight handle.) Although the two terms may be used interchangeably, particularly in the context of Etruscan culture, phiale is more common in reference to Greek forms, and patera in a Roman setting.

Inspiration

Roman personal casserole (cooking pot) patera with manufacturers sign CAM IIII with colander with manufacturers sign CAMBARO.