Bruce Two Handed Sword

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AH3417.jpg
A.Bruce Two Handed Sword
B.Two Handed Scotsman Broad Sword
C.The Gallowglass Sword
SKU: A.AH3417, B.AH3239, C.AH3418
Actual Weight: -----
Shipping Weight: -----
MSRP: -----



Product Detail



Product Name:
A.Bruce Two Handed Sword
B.Two Handed Scotsman Broad Sword
C.The Gallowglass Sword

SKU: A.AH3417, B.AH3239, C.AH3418

Features

  • A: Bruce-Two Handed Bruce Sword, a classic hand and a half sword or claymore
  • Double edged, solid steel blade with long ricasso and broad fuller cross section down much of its length
  • wide guard has straight quillons, capped with downward curved tips
  • features a small shield placard at its center
  • a crisscrossed leather wrapped hilt
  • unadorned scent stopper pommel.
  • B. Two handed a classic hand and a half sword or claymore
  • Overall Length: 67 inches (over 5 feet!)
  • steel blade, a lenticular (gently curved) cross-section, on a long, and straight-edged, with a tip that quickly rounds off and tapers to a point
  • guard features curled quillons and a round disc base,
  • leather-wrapped hilt with a matched small pommel
  • C: Gallowglass two handed sword in the Irish style sword of high carbon steel
  • hilt and pommel are of steel
  • Overall Length: 54 1/2 Blade: 41 7/8
  • Weight: 6 lb 5.8 oz
  • Edge: Blunt
  • P.O.B.: 9 1/8
  • Thickness: 5 mm - 4.7 mm
  • Width: 63.9 mm
  • Grip Length: 8 5/8
  • Pommel: Peened

Description

  • A: Bruce Two Handed Sword- a classic hand and a half sword or claymore. A double edged blade of solid steel, with a long ricasso and a broad fuller cross section that continues down much of its length. It also features a gentle taper. The wide guard has straight quillons, capped with downward curved tips, and also features a small shield placard at its center. The hilt is wrapped in crisscross leather, and the tip of the hilt is finished off with an unadorned scent stopper pommel.
  • B: Based on a blade that was reported to have been wielded by the real William Wallace in the Battle of Stirling Bridge and in the Battle of Falkirk, during the Wars of Scottish Independence. The massive length is one of the key feature for this powerful looking blade. The sword has a lenticular (gently curved) cross-section, on a long, straight-edged blade that is made entirely from high carbon steel. The tip of the blade quickly rounds off and tapers to a point, although given its size, this sword is more immediately a cutting weapon than a thrusting one. The unique guard features curled quillons and a round disc base, which connects to the brown leather-wrapped hilt. Standing at approximately 67 inches along, this blade is nothing if not massive.
  • C: This Gallowglass sword, is a large two handed sword in the Irish style with its iconic ring pommel. The blade is of high carbon steel. The hilt and its iconic ring pommel are of steel and the grip is wrapped in tight, brown leather. Although battle ready by virtue of the type of steel and construction, these swords are very thick and quite blade heavy. As a result they can be very difficult to sharpen into good cutting swords. They are better suited to display, collecting and reenactment. Overall Length: 54 1/2 Blade: 41 7/8. Weight: 6 lb 5.8 oz Edge: Blunt P.O.B.: 9 1/8, thickness: 5 mm - 4.7 mm, width: 63.9 mm, Grip Length: 8 5/8, Pommel: Peened

Historical Period

ca. 1400—1700

Inspiration

A: Robert the Bruce, King of Scots from 1306 until his death in 1329. Robert was one of the most famous warriors of his generation, eventually leading Scotland during the Wars of Scottish Independence against England.

B. based on a blade that was reported to have been wielded by the real William Wallace in the Battle of Stirling Bridge and in the Battle of Falkirk, during the Wars of Scottish Independence

C: the Gallowglass were a class of elite mercenary warriors who were principally members of the Norse-Gaelic clans of Scotland between the mid 13th century and late 16th century. Irish gallowglass and kern. Drawing by Albrecht Dürer, 1521.